To reduce the number of Victims work needs to be done with Perpetrators

Each year more than 100,000 people in the UK are at high and imminent risk of being murdered or seriously injured as a result of domestic abuse.

To reduce the number of Victims work needs to be done with Perpetrators

West Midlands Police are seeking to jointly commission a new perpetrator programme with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner. This programme aims to fundamentally change perpetrator behaviour to make victims and families safe. Their view is that in order to reduce the number of victims, they must reduce the number of perpetrators.

The DRIVE project was launched in 2016, initially piloted in Essex, South Wales and West Sussex, and highlighted in the government’s VAWG strategy for its innovative approach. This is now being extended to other pilot areas, supported by the Home Office through the Police Transformation Fund in England and Wales, to grow the evidence base to support interventions and test the results with different demographics with the hope that this way of working might be rolled out nationally. There will be additional information available to test and learn from the replication process. DRIVE is focussed on using an evidence based, intensive 1:1 case management approach in the context of local multi-agency work to create change and reduce the number and severity of incidences of domestic abuse.

Each year more than 100,000 people in the UK are at high and imminent risk of being murdered or seriously injured as a result of domestic abuse. Services rightly focus on meeting the needs of victims but too often perpetrators are not held to account, and their abusive behaviour continues.  Only 1% of perpetrators get a specialist intervention that might prevent future abusive behaviour and as a result there is a high level of repeat victimisation. They want long-term solutions to tackle domestic abuse: to reduce the number of victims – they feel they must challenge perpetrators to stop.

Drive challenges perpetrators of domestic abuse. It will develop, test and evaluate a new model to fundamentally change perpetrator behaviour to make victims and families safe. To reduce the number of victims, they feel they must reduce number of perpetrators.

They are aiming to change the public narrative from ‘why doesn’t she leave’ to ‘why doesn’t he stop?’

The Drive Partnership is made up of Respect, SafeLives and Social Finance. The pilot programmes will be delivered in Essex, South Wales and West Sussex. The project has also benefited from local authority support.

West Midlands Police are seeking to jointly commission a new perpetrator programme with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner. This programme aims to fundamentally change perpetrator behaviour to make victims and families safe. Their view is that in order to reduce the number of victims, they must reduce the number of perpetrators.

The DRIVE project was launched in 2016, initially piloted in Essex, South Wales and West Sussex, and highlighted in the government’s VAWG strategy for its innovative approach. This is now being extended to other pilot areas, supported by the Home Office through the Police Transformation Fund in England and Wales, to grow the evidence base to support interventions and test the results with different demographics with the hope that this way of working might be rolled out nationally. There will be additional information available to test and learn from the replication process. DRIVE is focussed on using an evidence based, intensive 1:1 case management approach in the context of local multi-agency work to create change and reduce the number and severity of incidences of domestic abuse.

Each year more than 100,000 people in the UK are at high and imminent risk of being murdered or seriously injured as a result of domestic abuse. Services rightly focus on meeting the needs of victims but too often perpetrators are not held to account, and their abusive behaviour continues.  Only 1% of perpetrators get a specialist intervention that might prevent future abusive behaviour and as a result there is a high level of repeat victimisation. They want long-term solutions to tackle domestic abuse: to reduce the number of victims – they feel they must challenge perpetrators to stop.

Drive challenges perpetrators of domestic abuse. It will develop, test and evaluate a new model to fundamentally change perpetrator behaviour to make victims and families safe. To reduce the number of victims, they feel they must reduce number of perpetrators.

They are aiming to change the public narrative from ‘why doesn’t she leave’ to ‘why doesn’t he stop?’

The Drive Partnership is made up of Respect, SafeLives and Social Finance. The pilot programmes will be delivered in Essex, South Wales and West Sussex. The project has also benefited from local authority support.

 

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